Archive | February, 2011

The Only Way Out is Through

When you read this be proud of yourself and know that it is safe to trust that all will be well. You are on the right path and you have the courage to follow it and reach the outcome you want.

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The Gift and Challenge of Sensitivity

(By Linda Markley) There is a good chance that your nervous system, your mind and emotions function differently from other peoples. According to recent research (see ‘The Highly Sensitive Person’ by Elaine N. Aron) a percentage of all populations on the planet, human and animal, have especially sensitive nervous systems. This sensitivity is not only apparent in psychological terms but can be demonstrated in the laboratory by physiological arousal levels in response to stimulation.

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Psychology and Spirituality

A talk to staff at the Kenilworth Clinic, Tuesday 11th May, 2010 – by Dr Richard Oxtoby, M.Sc, Ph.D.

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The Mourner’s Bill of Rights

(by Alan D. Wolfelt, Ph.D.) Though you should reach out to others as you do the work of mourning, you should not feel obligated to accept the unhelpful responses you may receive from some people. You are the one who is grieving, and as such, you have certain “rights” no one should try to take away from you. The following list is intended both to empower you to heal and to decide how others can and cannot help. This is not to discourage you from reaching out to others for help, but rather to assist you in distinguishing useful responses from hurtful ones.

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Islam and Life After Death

The question of life after death has always agitated the minds of people belonging to all religions and all ages alike. There is also the atheistic view which totally denies the possibility of life after death. The religions which believe in life after death can be divided into two categories.

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Why Dogs Don’t Live Longer Than People

Being a veterinarian, I was called to examine a ten-year- old Irish
Wolfhound named Belker. The dog’s owners, Ron, his wife, Lisa, and their
little boy, Shane, were all very attached to Belker and they were hoping
for a miracle.

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Commonly asked questions about grief

How long will this go on? Am I going mad? These and other commonly asked questions…

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Five Regrets of the Dying

(By Bronnie Ware) For many years I worked in palliative care. My patients were those who had gone home to die. Some incredibly special times were shared. I was with them for the last three to twelve weeks of their lives. People grow a lot when they are faced with their own mortality. I learned never to underestimate someone’s capacity for growth. Some changes were phenomenal. Each experienced a variety of emotions, as expected, denial, fear, anger, remorse, more denial and eventually acceptance. Every single patient found their peace before they departed though, every one of them.

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Death

What a wonderful way to explain it…

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After the Storm

(By Janis Amatuzio, M.D.) The night after my beloved grandmother died, twenty-eight years ago, I was awakened in the stillness of the early-morning hours when I became aware of her presence at the foot of my bed. She had been diagnosed with breast cancer four years earlier, at the age of eighty-five. She had died in Seattle while visiting her son; my mother had flown out to be with her as her condition had worsened. Dad had told us of her death, and I was devastated. My grandmother and I were very close. When I was a young child, she had lived with my mother and me in California while my father was serving in the Korean conflict. Back then, she was my playmate and sandbox companion; in adulthood she had been my closest friend and confidante.

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